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  • JPT Team

Cardboard Tubes In Architecture

As a leading provider of cardboard tubes, Just Paper Tubes (JPT) is always looking for ways to engage with our customers. Recently, we saw one of our competitors refer to the work of architect Shigeru Ban and his use of cardboard tubes in his designs. While we appreciate the recognition of Ban's innovative work, we also believe that the wider cardboard tubes industry needs a proper explainer on the topic rather than a passing paragraph, and that's why we decided to take on the task.


Shigeru Ban is a Japanese architect who is known for his use of unconventional materials in his designs. One of his signature materials is cardboard tubes, which he has used to create a wide range of structures, from temporary emergency shelters to permanent buildings. Ban's use of cardboard tubes has not only garnered attention for its unique aesthetic appeal but also for its environmental benefits.





Cardboard tubes are an eco-friendly material that is both recyclable and biodegradable. They are also relatively inexpensive and readily available, making them an attractive option for designers and architects who are looking for sustainable materials to use in their projects. In addition to their environmental benefits, cardboard tubes are also strong and durable, and can be easily manipulated and shaped to fit a variety of design needs.


Ban's work with cardboard tubes began in 1986 when he was a student at Cooper Union in New York City. He was working on a project that required the use of a column, and he found himself drawn to the idea of using a cardboard tube instead of a traditional building material. Ban was intrigued by the idea of using a material that was both lightweight and strong, and he saw the potential for using cardboard tubes in a wide range of applications.


Since then, Ban has used cardboard tubes in a variety of his projects, including the Paper Arch at the Centre Pompidou-Metz in France and the Cardboard Cathedral in Christchurch, New Zealand. The Paper Arch is a large-scale installation that consists of 96 paper tubes that are arranged in a curve to create a sweeping, dramatic effect. The Cardboard Cathedral is a permanent structure that was built in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake in Christchurch. The building features a unique A-frame design that is made up of 98 cardboard tubes, which were reinforced with timber beams and steel plates.





Ban's work with cardboard tubes has inspired many other designers and architects to experiment with the material. One notable example is the Paper Pavilion, which was designed by architect and artist Miguel Fisac in collaboration with cardboard tube manufacturer Sonoco. The pavilion consists of 56 cardboard tubes that are arranged in a circular pattern to create a unique and immersive space.


At JPT, we believe that cardboard tubes have enormous potential in a wide range of applications, from architecture and design to packaging and shipping. Cardboard tubes are not only sustainable and environmentally friendly, but they are also versatile and adaptable, making them an attractive option for designers who are looking for innovative materials to use in their projects.


In conclusion, Shigeru Ban's work with cardboard tubes has helped to bring attention to the potential of this innovative material. At JPT, we believe that cardboard tubes have enormous potential in a wide range of applications, and we are proud to be a leading provider of high-quality, eco-friendly cardboard tubes. If you are interested in learning more about cardboard tubes or exploring ways to incorporate them into your projects, we encourage you to get in touch with us today.

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